Best practices for staying up-to-date with documentation

5 Commentaires

  • Jack Harrison-Sherlock
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    Hey Nivedita, 

    I'd recommend looking into KCS. Knowledge-centered support is a methodology that focuses on knowledge as a key asset of the organization. KCS is not something to do in addition to solving issues, KCS becomes the way in which you resolve issues. KCS does not replace the knowledge and experience of your support agents—rather, it complements them. Organizations that have implemented KCS report dramatic improvements in operating costs, incident/request resolution, customer satisfaction, job satisfaction, and significant reduction in training times. Atlassian has created some great content on KCS:

    https://www.atlassian.com/it-unplugged/knowledge-management/get-started-with-knowledge-centered-support

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWr6guAQjWc&t=2868s

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  • Jessie Schutz
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    Hi Nivedita! Thanks for sharing this great conversation starter! I'm going to mark this to add to our September Community Roundup to see if we can find more folks to add their input!

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  • Nivedita Mahesh
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    Hi Jack! Thank you very much for your reply, I'll definitely check it out!

     

    Thanks, Jessie!

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  • Lou Abigail Menard
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    Hi Nivedita,

    I'm a documentation lead for a software company, and maybe I can give you an overall idea of how we do it in the documentation aspect of things.

    Although, you may be doing these in your company already (except for #1 below), but here's my input:

    You mentioned, "we don't have a team dedicated to just documentation,". In our company, our support agents and product owners also try to find time to contribute to the documentation side, but a team dedicated fully to documentation (such as mine) removes extra stuff on your support/managers plate and they can fully focus on support/management.

    1. It's advisable you start a doco-team, even if you just start with 1 writer or 2 writers, who will work closely with your support agents/managers. 

    2. Every ticket/issue, will either flag your existing article (that needs revisions), or trigger an action to create a new article, so that if ever that issue/question arise again, there is a ready document to forward to your customer. (Documentation can be - Overall Functional Description, a How-To (performing step-by-steps), a Troubleshoolting article, or a Tips and Best Practice article )

    3. Have a ready template for your documents - Template for each if you have:

    • User Guide
    • Troubleshoot
    • How-To's
    • Best Practices

    so that, your support agents or managers will just fill-out this template with keywords, and basic/overall explanation (which will not take a lot of their time) like what is this article for? etc... then your writer will be the one to polish it according to your company's standards or formats. 

    4. Using labels in the article 

    5. Use Zendesk's Knowledge Capture app, link your articles in your support ticket, or create new articles straight from there, (can use your ready-template too)

    6. When our support agent finds an article that needs revision, they use the Knowledge Capture App to "flag" it, then that automatically creates another ticket (task ticket) that is automatically sent to my team (doco) for further actions. Same process for new articles needed.

    That's basically our doco process in general.

     

     

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  • Nicole - Community Manager
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    Thanks for sharing all of that, Lou!

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