Forecasting ticket staffing

5 コメント

  • Antonio King
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    Anybody have any advice?

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  • Jessie Schutz
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    Hey Antonio! Sorry you haven't gotten an answer on this yet.

    I'm checking with some of our moderators to see if they have any input for you, and I'll try to track down one of our Support managers to see if they have any thoughts to share as well. We definitely have ticket SLAs that our Customer Advocates work with, but I'm not totally sure how all our various offices work together to handle staffing. Hopefully I'll be able to find something helpful for you!

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  • Antonio King
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    Jessie,


    Thanks for the response! Was starting to feel a bit lonely. :(

    If it helps, people can communicate with me directly via email, too: tones@shinesty.com.


    Thanks again! :)

     

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  • Andrea Saez
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    Hey Antonio,

    I don't think there's a scientific answer for this to be honest. I've found that (on average) any given agent should be able to manage around 300 tickets per week. That's about 60 per day for an 8 hour work week, with an average work-process of about 10 mins each. That should be a regular workload. If you're pushing 350 tickets a week, then maybe it's time to consider hiring a new person. 

    This would of course depend on what your SLA is, it could most certainly vary between 300-400 tickets in a week per agent, but you don't only need to keep in mind SLA's but also stress put on the agents as they try to hit SLA's. A happy agent is a good agent!

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  • Jessie Schutz
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    I spoke with a couple of our support managers, and they echoed Andrea's point that forecasting is really subjective. Requirements and methods vary so much from industry to industry, and even business to business, there's really no one "right" way to do it.

    At the most basic level, you have to look at your agent's productivity (ie: how many tickets they can do in a given time period) and compare it to your incoming volume.

    From there you'd start tweaking it based on what your SLAs are, and how many tickets you get that are impacted by those SLAs, as well as how you prioritize your queue, what your hours of operation are, how many tickets come in during off hours, etc.

    I imagine that it's largely going to be a process of trial and error until you light on the thing that works best for you. And to Andrea's point about happy agents being good agents, definitely listen to your agents when they have feedback about what's working and what's not. As the people on the front lines, they're the subject-matter experts!

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